Category Archives: ZOE Z.E. 40

Renault Gets an Electric Car to Write Jack Kerouac Fan Fiction via Artificial Intelligence

A new campaign for Renault in Sweden sees its Zoe electric car “write” Jack Kerouac fan fiction for test drivers via artificial intelligence.

According to agency Edelman Deportivo, one of the major obstacles to widespread electric-car adoption is commonly labelled “range anxiety,” or the fear that a vehicle has insufficient range to reach its destination. So the effort aims to show how far a Renault can go in a single charge, by showing a car going where no other has gone before — by turning automobile into “author.”

The “Written by Zoe” promotes the Zoe, which has a 400km range. The brand obtained permission from the the estate of Jack Kerouac to write authorized fan fiction stories based on the themes and style of writing of his novel “On the Road” (which celebrates its 60th anniversary this year).

The “stories” are entirely composed through live driving data from Stockholm test drives in the Zoe, with the help of AI-technology. The idea is that, by analyzing “On The Road” and using the car’s internal and external sensor data to turn it into contextual storylines, the system writes unique stories for each driver.

Read more: Creativity Online

Renault Zoe vs rivals – cost analysis

We’re all pretty clued-up about the benefits to zero-emission driving these days. Not only do electric cars help to improve air quality, lower your SMR costs and bring a reduction in BIK tax bills, they also deliver huge savings by not relying on fuel.

According to many experts, we are now getting very close to mass adoption of electric cars here in the UK. But they’re still a niche choice for many fleets because higher P11D prices and anxieties over range remain key stumbling blocks.

A whole-life cost approach is essential and, as discussed in the previous pages, they have to be fit for purpose to provide enough savings to outweigh the initial cost. But technology is improving at a considerable rate and battery ranges are increasing with every update.

The Renault Zoe

Refreshed in 2016, now offers an official 250-mile range – the best the sector has to offer, Tesla aside.

According to the French carmaker, if you use the most efficient means possible, like charging at night, running a Zoe could cost as little as 2p per mile in warmer weather, rising to 3ppm when the nights draw in. As well as offering the best range of our four cars here, the Zoe is also the cheapest to buy with P11D prices starting as low as £18,440. Despite some disappointing residual values, which are a common theme for most electric cars currently, the Zoe is the cheapest per mile too, costing 52.9p.

Renault Zoe Dynamique Nav 41kWh R90 – 52.2p CPM
P11D: £27,890
CO2 (tax): 0g/km (7%)
BIK 20/40% per month: £33/£65
Official range: 250 miles
National Insurance: £1,116
Boot space: 338 litres
Battery size/power: 41kW/92hp
0-62mph: 13.5 seconds
Residual value: 18.7%/£5,225
Fuel costs: £600
SMR: £890

Nissan Leaf

The biggest-selling electric car here in the UK by some margin, the Nissan Leaf also had a battery upgrade in 2016, which saw its range increase up to 155 miles.

Not only is the Leaf the most popular of our models here, it’s also the most practical, offering a 355-litre boot and the most interior space. The Nissan is also easy to drive and comfortable over longer distances.

Nissan Leaf Acenta 30kWh
P11D: £30,235
CO2 (tax): 0g/km (7%)
BIK 20/40% per month: £35/£71
Official range: 153 miles
National Insurance: £1,210
Boot space: 355 litres
Battery size/power: 30kW/111hp
0-62mph: 11.5 seconds
Residual value: 16.9%/£5,100
Fuel costs: £980
SMR: £1,029

BMW i3

First launched in 2013, the i3 not only marked the start of BMW’s EV model range, it also moved the game forwards considerably for electric car technology as a whole. It was a game-changer in every sense, and although it’s struggled to gain momentum in sales against its rivals, the i3 has remained one of the most desirable and technologically advanced electric cars on the market.

A battery update in 2016 doubled the car’s range to 195 miles officially on one charge, although the carmaker believes 125 miles is more realistic in real-world conditions, plus the i3 is also fitted with a new charging system that is 50% faster.

BMW i3 94ah eDrive
P11D: £32,485
CO2 (tax): 0g/km (7%)
BIK 20/40% per month: £38/£76
Official range: 195 miles
National Insurance: £1,300
Boot space: 260 litres
Battery size/power: 33kW/170hp
0-62mph: 7.3 seconds
Residual value: 30.2%/£9,825
Fuel costs: £1,200
SMR: £1,216

Hyundai IONIQ

The first car to be available in hybrid, plug-in hybrid and electric forms, the Ioniq moved Hyundai into new territory when the car was launched last year. It’s all part of the firm’s plans to have as many as 28 eco-friendly models on sale by 2020.

Arguably the most eye-catching of the four cars, the Ioniq also has one of the biggest boots, and its official 174-mile range is one of the best on offer here too. RVs, as we explained earlier, leave a lot to be desired for EVs in general; however, the Ioniq still manages to better both the Zoe and Leaf at 20.3%, and only the Renault is cheaper per mile for whole-life costs.

Hyundai Ioniq Premium
P11D: £28,940
CO2 (tax): 0g/km (7%)
BIK 20/40% per month: £34/£68
Official range: 174 miles
National Insurance: £1,158
Boot space: 350 litres
Battery size/power: 28kW/120hp
0-62mph: 10.2 seconds
Residual value: 20.3%/£5,875
Fuel costs: £862
SMR: £1,222

Read more: Business Car

The Eco Tour Di Sicilia And Renault Zoe Help Put Italy’s Cultural Heritage Centre Stage

  • Renault signs partnership agreements with Sicily by Car and Enel, two prominent mobility players in Italy, to launch the Eco Tour di Sicilia
  • The first of its kind, the Eco Tour di Sicilia will showcase Sicily’s rich culture while protecting its environment by employing a fleet of 200 Renault ZOE

Renault today announced the signing of an exclusive partnership with Sicily by Car, a leading car rental company in Italy, and Enel, the country’s largest energy supplier, to roll out the Eco Tour di Sicilia. This initiative by Sicily by Car will make it possible to tour the whole of Sicily exclusively by electric car and will add 200 Renault ZOEs to Sicily by Car’s fleet.

The first of its kind in Italy and Europe, the Eco Tour di Sicilia aims to overcome the obstacles that hamper green mobility in Sicily, such as limited vehicle range or a lack of charging stations.

ZOE is currently the only mass-market electric car on the market to offer an NEDC range of 250 miles, equivalent to about 186 miles in real-world conditions. The eco-tour project will also deploy a network of charging stations on the island: up to 400 Enel chargers are to be installed in the region’s principal cities and along tourist itineraries. Residents will be able to use these public charging stations for their own electric vehicles. The opportunity to take a long road trip while enjoying regular access to charging points will bring unexplored freedom of movement to all-electric travel in both urban and rural settings.

Bernard Chrétien, CEO, Renault Italy said:

“By supporting e-mobility, we are enhancing and protecting the extraordinary natural, artistic and cultural heritage of which the Sicily region is such an excellent example.”

An electric vehicle is a zero-emissions[1] form of mobility and the ideal means of transport to fight the greenhouse effect responsible for global warming. Electric vehicles are also key to cleaner air and better health for city dwellers. And since they do not run on fossil fuels, they help drive the automobile industry’s energy transition.

Source: Groupe Renault

2017 Renault Zoe review: A cure for range anxiety

It’s just like the original Zoe, but this version of Renault’s electric car goes on and on.

Portugal, Renault, and electric cars are becoming indivisibly linked in my mind. I test drove the Renault Fluence in Lisbon in November 2011, and then the Renault Zoe a few miles up the coast in March 2013. I liked both cars, but with effective touring ranges of around 80 miles, I’d be the first to admit they had their limitations.

The latest version of the Zoe, the Z.E. 40, is an attempt to address that limitation. While the 2013 model had a 22kWh battery, the 2017 incarnation packs nearly twice as much energy: 41kWh, to be precise, with a real-world range of about 190 miles.

Renault ZOE (image: Ars Technica)

Same-sized battery, twice the range

The increase in battery capacity is a pretty impressive achievement when you consider that the lithium-ion pack occupies the same space as the old unit and weighs only 15 kilos more.

Developed by LG Chem, the new battery has improved chemistry and a redesigned internal structure that has increased the active surface area within the cells by 10 percent. The individual cells are now also thicker and the empty space between them has been reduced. If that all sounds a bit vague, it’s because neither Renault or LG Chem are about to spill the really interesting technical beans.

Renault ZOE, Battery illustration (image: Renault)

The end result of fitting a higher-capacity battery is that the Zoe 40 has an NEDC-certified range of 250 miles or, as Renault freely admits, a real-world summer range of 186 miles. It reckons that figure drops to 124 miles in full-on winter running.

Fair weather notwithstanding I didn’t quite manage to hit that magic 186-mile range. On two long-distance runs that included a mix of high-speed motorway driving and energetic hustling along Portugal’s back roads, I managed to get 175 and 163 miles from two full charges.

The second run included a rapid approach into Lisbon along the A8 from Caldas da Rainha with my foot down and the Zoe bowling along at close to its maximum speed. The weather was mild during the test so the climate-control system was seldom needed, but a fair amount of night-time driving was involved. The Zoe’s headlights may be efficient but they are also dismal.

Considering that on both days of the test I found myself running behind schedule and was therefore driving in a manner that I’d politely describe as energetic, I was happy with those range numbers. Improving on them really wouldn’t have been difficult.

But as with all electric cars it’s the psychology of range that is as important as the actuality. Because each morning the Zoe 40 told me I had a minimum of around 180 miles of range rather than 90 I didn’t experience the kind of range anxiety induced by the original model.

Even when forced to double back in the middle of nowhere because of a flooded road, take a 15 mile detour, and drive down a rutted track in the pitch dark (satnavs and Portugal are not a stellar combination), my range-sphincter didn’t pucker.

Read more: Ars Technica

New Renault ZOE ZE40 Prices

Best Renault ZOE Z.E.40 Deals

We have new PCP prices for April for the new Renault ZOE with the ‘Z.E. 40’ long range battery, and we’re pleased to now offer deals with the deposit reduced to £999 (from £1199 previously).

And don’t forget, you get your first 10,000 miles of motoring for free (we refund the cost of charging at home).

Contact Us

 

Renault ZOE Z.E. 40 Example Colours (Image: Renault)
Renault ZOE Z.E. 40 Example Colours (Image: Renault)

These are the current prices including fuel, road tax and VAT (from 11 April 2017):

Annual MileageDynamique Nav R90 Monthly Cost
(£999 Deposit)
Signature Nav R90 Monthly Cost
(£999 Deposit)
Fuel Included Total Miles
5,000£281£33110,000
6,000£284£33410,000
7,500£296£34810,000
8,000£308£35910,000
10,000£321£37310,000
12,000£336£38710,000
15,000£340£39310,000
20,000£348£40210,000
Contact Us

 

The new battery has an ‘official’ NEDC range of 250 miles equivalent to a highly impressive real-world range of 170-200 miles in temperate conditions (reducing to 120-130 miles in extreme cold conditions). This ZOE is available in new colours, including red for the first time, and there are other detail changes – full details are here and here.

We are offering a Renault ZOE R90 with Z.E.40 battery on 3 year PCP; this stands for Personal Contract Purchase and is currently the most popular way to buy a car because of its flexibility. You put down a deposit, pay an affordable monthly fee (less than many people spend just on petrol), and drive away a new car with fuel included. At the end of the three year term you can choose to pay an optional lump sum and keep the car, or you can just give the car back and upgrade to the latest model.

It’s like a mobile phone contract, but with miles rather than minutes included.

The new ZOE Z.E.40 comes in two versions, the Dynamique Nav and the Signature Nav. The Dynamique Nav is well specified with TomTom® satnav, climate control, electric windows, heated mirrors, cruise control & speed limiter, Bluetooth, remote control of climate control and charging, 16″ alloy wheels, auto lights and wipers, and rear parking sensors.

The Signature Nav adds leather upholstery, heated front seats, BOSE® audio system, and rear camera.

Renault ZOE Z.E.40
Renault ZOE Z.E.40 in Mars Red

The other terms are as follows:

  • There’s an initial payment (‘deposit’), as specified, when you order.
  • There is a Rapid charge option (‘Q90’) for £22 per month.
  • A finance fee of £99 will be added to the first monthly payment.
  • All prices include VAT (these offers are only available to private customers).
  • The excess mileage fee is typically 16p per mile (8p for car, 8p for battery).
  • Fuel included: you get free electricity over the contract term as listed above (this is at the Economy 7 rate but you are not required to switch to Economy 7).
  • You get free road tax and congestion charge exemption.
  • You get a free home charge point paid for by Renault.
  • You get free breakdown recovery, and telephone and email support.
  • All prices quoted include battery rental.

Full details of what’s included in the deals are on the Fuel Included offer page.

Contact Us

Coverage: We have bases and electric car suppliers in Milton Keynes, St Albans, London, Northampton, Bedford, Cannock, Leicester and Liverpool allowing us to supply all around the Midlands (including London, Luton, Oxford, Rugby, Kettering, Coventry, Nottingham and Birmingham). However we can deliver all around the country – just contact us for details.

Renault Zoe electric-car owners can upgrade leased batteries

When the updated 2017 Renault Zoe was unveiled last fall at the Paris auto show, it became one of the few electric cars whose range effectively doubled over its model life.

Launched in 2012 with a 22-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery, the five-door subcompact hatchback had an effective range of 60 to 90 miles.

That was essentially on par with that of the Nissan Leaf, EPA-rated at 73 miles that year.

But this year’s battery upgrade to 41 kwh changed everything.

It gave the Zoe, Renault says, a range of 300 to 400 kilometers (185 to 250 miles) on the European test cycle.

Renault Zoe ZE40. Paris Motor Show 2016

Here’s the unusual feature, though: owners of earlier Zoes can get the larger, longer-range battery—by swapping in their old battery.

As a press release from Renault last week pointed out, many Zoe owners chose to lease their battery from Renault rather than buy it.

As Renault notes:

Thanks to battery leasing, as of spring 2017, owners of a Zoe equipped with a 22-kwh pack can upgrade to the [41-kwh] battery without changing their vehicle, and benefit from increased range.

Renault Zoe ZE40. Paris Motor Show 2016

Read more: Green Car Reports

The Engineer drives: going electric with the Renault Zoe Z.E. 40

Renault has almost doubled the battery capacity of its electric supermini, the Zoe. Chris Pickering puts it to the test

Could it be that the electric car has finally come of age? Stepping into the new Renault Zoe Z.E. 40 I would be inclined to argue it has. In some respects, this unassuming little car might seem like an underwhelming choice to back up that claim. After all, it takes more than four times as long to crack the 0-to-60mph sprint as the Tesla Model X we featured last month.

If you look at what‘s kept drivers from going electric in the past, though, the Zoe now ticks an awful lot of boxes. Renault has virtually doubled its range with the launch of this new 41kWh version, which is good for 250 miles on the NEDC test cycle. That’s said to equate to around 186 miles of real-world driving in good conditions – nearly 20 times the length of the average British commute.

The 41kWh version of the Zoe is comparable to a well-specified Ford Focus

This extended range has been achieved without changing the physical dimensions of the battery and with only a 15kg weight increase. It still contains 192 cells arranged in 12 modules, but battery developer LG Chem has managed to pack more active materials into each one. Meanwhile, the surface area of the electrodes has been increased by some 10 per cent and a new cooling system aims to ensure more consistent performance across the temperature range.

The next obstacle has traditionally been cost, but while the Zoe is somewhat pricier than a conventional supermini it’s an order of magnitude cheaper than offerings from companies such as Tesla. Starting at £23,445 (including the government’s Plug-in Car Grant) the 41kWh version is comparable to a well-specified Ford Focus.

That said, over 90 per cent of buyers choose to lease the battery separately (priced at between £59 and £110 a month, depending on the mileage), which drops the purchase price to £17,845. Opt for the entry-level 22kWh version and that figure falls to just £13,995.

The Zoe comes with a clever onboard charging system, dubbed the Chameleon

Finally, the Zoe comes with a clever onboard charging system, dubbed the Chameleon. This means it can draw the maximum power from virtually any charging point, including the 43kW fast chargers that are increasingly found in motorway service stations. As a result, the Q90 version – more on that in a minute – can fill 80 per cent of its battery in just over an hour. Renault even includes a fully installed 7kW Chargemaster home-charging system with each car.

Read more: The Engineer

 

ELECTRIC RALLY CAR SPARKS SUCCESS

Fife-based eRally Motorsport have built the first electric rally car, a Renault Zoe which is charging into Formula 1000 in 2018.

The prototype car will be used in junior rallying, for 14 to 17-year-olds, after being tested in the senior division this year.

Thanks to help from Business Gateway Fife, eRally, which is based just outside Rosyth, has created a sponsorship package that has already attracted Aberdeen’s EC-OG. Further deals are currently being sought which would help the company reduce the car’s price tag from £15k to under £10k.

The sponsorship deals, alongside a commitment from RCI Financial Services to supply a number of donor vehicles to the team over the next 12 months, will also help keep them on course to launch the eRally Championship in Scotland within the next three years.

Jean Hay, co-driver and project coordinator at eRally Motorsport Ltd, said:

“We now have a complete package – a rally ready car and sponsorship deals on offer. Although the number of cars RCI Financial Services Ltd’s will supply to us at a discounted or subsidised rate has yet to be decided, having them on board will help us showcase electric car rally driving to the nation.”

Fraser McKee, Business Gateway Fife, said:

“We’ve provided eRally with information on how to run a rally team as a business. Getting the pricing structure for sponsorship correct was crucial and with our help they now have packages that will attract the right companies”

eRally’s electric rally car is the brainchild of former British Rally Championship and current Scottish Rally Championship driver Ellya Gold and Tristan Dodd, Chairman of Formula 1000.

Although the original idea for the car arose in 2006, it wasn’t until Tristan approach the Motorsport Association with the idea of producing an electric car for youngsters to drive last year that approval was given.

The prototype eRally car is powered by a 65kw motor which provides a maximum torque of 220Nm – double the torque currently used in the junior section. The 20kWh lithium ion battery gives the car a competitive range, when driven flat out, of around 25 miles.

Renault has recently launched a new 41kWh battery pack that will effectively double the range of further eRally cars built for customers.

Read more: BQ Weekly

Taster test of the new Renault ZOE

While the LEAF from sister brand Nissan continues to grab all the headlines associated with it being first to the party, the ZOE has built itself a loyal following since the car’s launch in 2012 and was the best-selling electric car in Europe in 2015.

What is it? The latest version of the Renault ZOE electric supermini.
Key features: New battery increases official range to 250 miles. New top trim level, updates across range.
Our view: The Renault ZOE is a definite contender amongst its electric rivals, particularly considering its versatile purchase options and now its range.
Type of review: Taster test.

For 2017 Renault has introduced a facelift for the ZOE, the major headline of which is a new 41kWh battery. This is almost double the capacity of the original 22kWh battery and pushes the ZOE’s official range to 250 miles.

Longest range

While Renault claims that this gives the ZOE the longest range of any mainstream electric vehicle, we are also told that the car’s ‘real-world’ range between charges is now between 124 miles in extreme cold and 186 miles in ‘temperate’, in other words typical, conditions. This of course makes the ZOE a very practical car indeed – how often does the average motorist clock up more than 186 miles in a day?

Renault ZOE – the look

The biggest difference between the Renault ZOE and its great rival the Nissan LEAF, in this writer’s opinion, is in exterior looks. The LEAF, with its squared-off, slanted rear end, looks different enough to be identified as such, an electric car. The ZOE, however, looks just like any other supermini – it could just as easily be a traditional petrol/diesel sister to the Clio and Twingo and is very closely related to the former.

On the road

This is not a fast car, its 0-62mph time over 13 seconds, but it feels nippy in its natural environment of urban streets. At speeds under around 40mph the torque of the electric motor is at its most efficient, and the ZOE reaches 30mph in a mere four seconds.

It’s much less fun at high speeds, on a motorway for example, because above 60mph it seriously struggles for pace. Steep gradients cause similar issues, it will get up them, but not in any hurry.

Buying a ZOE

Electric cars are not cheap and on the surface the ZOE is no different, but there is a way to spread the cost. Renault offers the option of either buying the car and battery outright, or leasing the battery and paying a monthly fee that varies based on one’s expected mileage. This also answers those concerned about the staying power of the battery, though Renault does offer a five-year/60,000-mile warranty that includes the battery retaining at least 75 per cent of its original capacity.

Verdict:

The Renault ZOE won’t write headlines for its roadholding and handling but in the urban environment that electric cars are excepted to populate it becomes a leading contender. With its practical purchase options it should be considered by anyone wanting to go electric.

Read more: The Car Expert

Plug-In Electric Car Sales In Europe – January 2017 (Image: InsideEVs)

Europe: 31% More Plug-Ins Sold In January 2017 – Renault ZOE In Charge

Europe began 2017 with solid growth of plug-in electric car sales, up 31% year-over-year according to the EV Sales Blog report. In total, roughly 19,000 units were sold, which is not only the best January ever, but also one of the better months ever.

Renault ZOE took an early lead with 2,602 sales (up 80 percent) after securing 1st place in 2016.

Plug-In Electric Car Sales In Europe – January 2017 (Image: InsideEVs)
Plug-In Electric Car Sales In Europe – January 2017 (Image: InsideEVs)

In second place was the BMW i3 (1,818), which gives us one way to compare sales of different battery sizes. Renault is seeing better sales of the new 41-kWh ZOE, while i3 continues to sell the 33-kWh i3. Obviously, these cars are quite different, but with EVs, range does matter. And, if BEV sales are so tightly connected to battery pack capacity/range and price, we are eager to see the Opel Ampera-e later this year.

Nissan LEAF keeps seeing strong sales in Europe, taking 3rd place in January with 1,386 sales (up 29%). This EV’s battery increase – from 24 kWh to 30 kWh – wasn’t all that dramatic, and the Japanese manufacturer needs to do more soon. The top three BEVs sold in Europe totaled 5,806 units, which was 30.5 percent of all plug-in car sales. Tesla sold some 819 Model S (#7) and 586 Model X (#11) EVs.

Read more: Inside EVs