Category Archives: Leaf 30kWh

The Ioniq will first be available as a hybrid and EV, with a PHEV coming later

My IONIQ Test Drive

Together with my wife I set off to our local Hyundai dealer in Hendon for a test drive of the all-electric IONIQ Premium.

We are currently Leaf drivers and thinking of upgrading to the 30 kWh version. However, given the very positive range reports being given for the IONIQ, it made sense to try it as a possible alternative.

The Ioniq will first be available as a hybrid and EV, with a PHEV coming later
The IONIQ electric car

It was a booked test drive so we were disappointed to be kept waiting an extra 30 minutes, but eventually we got to go on the road.

My wife had her turn first, and took a few minutes to run over the controls and get everything set up. Our host took us on a route through rather slow, congested roads, so there was little chance to swoop on the open road. However, my wife enjoyed adjusting the regenerative braking to different levels and feeling the effect, as well as switching between the ECO, NORMAL and SPORT modes of drive. What she didn’t like was the bar across the back window where the spoiler is placed. Apparently, this is a major contributor to a low drag coefficient, but because they add glass below the spoiler, it does look a bit odd from the inside. I didn’t mind it myself.

After a few miles we swapped over and I enjoyed the feel of the sporty steering wheel. The layout of the controls was good and intuitive; I certainly preferred the steering wheel paddles for adjusting the regenerative levels, against the rather tiresome central lever in the Leaf. Eventually we came to a spot of more open road, and I was pleased at the sporty feel of the car to the throttle, even with 3 adults inside. As ever, the instantaneous response of an electric drive was satisfying (petrol automatics always have an annoying lag). We also saw some of the advanced driver support features such as accidental lane change warnings and car follow.

And of course, it has all the usual features of satnav, timers to pre-heat the car in the morning, and a good stereo. Unusually it doesn’t have an app to allow you to trigger pre-heat from your phone.

At the end of it our conclusions were:

  • Pros: sporty feel, apparently excellent range, nice roomy hatchback, advanced driver support features.
  • Cons: a slightly ordinary look externally, split glass on the back window, no app available for remote pre-heat.

So, a very impressive car. Left to me we would get the IONIQ, but my wife is a big Leaf fan. Watch this space. I’ll let you know what we choose eventually.

Nissan Leaf

New Nissan Leaf fuel included October 2016

Nissan Leaf Offers

We are pleased to announce our latest deals for the Nissan Leaf (from 1 October 2016) – and with free fuel! The big news is that the deal includes the supply and installation of a free home charge point by POD Point.

We are able to offer a brand new Nissan Leaf at very low rates allowing you to save on motoring expenses while driving away in an affordable brand new car. It’s a spacious car so ideal for a family. If you’re spending a lot on petrol, then you can pay for the car with what you save on fuel. You get to drive a new car for free!

Nissan Leaf
Nissan Leaf

We are offering the Nissan Leaf Acenta and Tekna (each in 24kWh and 30kWh versions) on 3 year PCP; this stands for Personal Contract Purchase and is currently the most popular way to buy a car because of its flexibility. You put down a low deposit, pay an affordable monthly fee (less than many people spend just on petrol), and drive away a new car with fuel included. At the end of the term you can choose to pay an optional lump sum and keep the car, or you can just give the car back and upgrade to the latest model.

It’s like a mobile phone contract, but with miles rather than minutes included.

The two versions have different sizes of battery and so have different ranges. Regarding this, Nissan says:

With an NEDC range of up to 124 miles (LEAF 24kWh) or up to 155 miles (LEAF 30kWh), it’s easily enough to cover most people’s needs.

We’d say this is optimistic and suggest that in typical use the standard 24kWh Leaf has a range of 60-90 miles, and the new 30kWh model has a range of 70-110 miles depending on ambient temperature and how you drive. Anyway, the 30kWh version clearly has a significant improvement in range and we would recommend it to most customers.

The Acenta is the mid-range model of the Leaf, the Tekna is the top-end model.

Nissan Leaf (Image: Autocar)
Nissan Leaf (Image: Autocar)

These are the current Leaf monthly prices (from 1 October):

Annual MileageAcenta 24kWhAcenta 30kWhTekna 24kWhTekna 30kWhFuel Included Mileage
3,000£277£283£313£334All
5,000£281£299.50£318£34010,000
6,000£284£307£321£34510,000
7,500£287£308£325£34910,000
9,000£291£314£330£35510,000
10,500£294£322£334£36010,000
12,000£298£326£336£36410,000
15,000£304£335£344£37410,000

The other terms are as follows:

  • You pay a deposit of £500 when you order.
  • Nissan make a deposit contribution of £5000.
  • Fuel included: you get 10,000 miles of free electricity over the term (this is at the Economy 7 rate though you are not required to switch to Economy 7)
  • You get free road tax and congestion charge exemption.
  • You get a free charge point.
  • You get free telephone and email support.
  • The standard colour is Flame Red (metallic paint adds about £17 per month – contact us for details)
  • The prices include the battery
  • If you were to go over the agreed mileage you would pay excess mileage

Full details of what’s included are on the Fuel Included offer page.

Contact Us

Nissan Leaf Spec

The Acenta version of the Leaf has a high specification, including:

  • Audio centre (CD, Bluetooth, iPod, USB) with 4 speakers and steering wheel controls
  • Electric windows and mirrors
  • Auto air conditioning
  • Home charging cable and rapid charging socket
  • Halogen headlamps, fog lamps, Thatcham alarm, immobiliser, daytime running lights
  • Tyre pressure monitoring system
  • 16″ alloy wheels
  • Privacy glass
  • Nissan Carwings telematics system with 7″ colour screen and 6 speakers
  • Cruise control/speed limiter
  • Auto wipers and lights

For more information download the latest Nissan LEAF Brochure.

Contact Us

Coverage: We have bases and suppliers in Milton Keynes, St Albans, Northampton, Bedford and Leicester allowing us to supply all around the Midlands (including London, Luton, Oxford, Rugby, Kettering, Coventry, Nottingham and Birmingham). However we can deliver via Nissan Retail Group dealerships all around the country – just contact us for details.

Nissan Leaf

New Nissan Leaf fuel included July 2016

Nissan Leaf Offers

We are pleased to announce our latest deals for the Nissan Leaf (from 1 July 2016) – and with free fuel! The big news is that the deal includes the supply and installation of a free home charge point by POD Point.

We are able to offer a brand new Nissan Leaf at very low rates allowing you to save on motoring expenses while driving away in an affordable brand new car. It’s a spacious car so ideal for a family. If you’re spending a lot on petrol, then you can pay for the car with what you save on fuel. You get to drive a new car for free!

Nissan Leaf
Nissan Leaf

We are offering the Nissan Leaf Acenta and Tekna (each in 24kWh and 30kWh versions) on 3 year PCP; this stands for Personal Contract Purchase and is currently the most popular way to buy a car because of its flexibility. You put down a low deposit, pay an affordable monthly fee (less than many people spend just on petrol), and drive away a new car with fuel included. At the end of the term you can choose to pay an optional lump sum and keep the car, or you can just give the car back and upgrade to the latest model.

It’s like a mobile phone contract, but with miles rather than minutes included.

The two versions have different sizes of battery and so have different ranges. Regarding this, Nissan says:

With an NEDC range of up to 124 miles (LEAF 24kWh) or up to 155 miles (LEAF 30kWh), it’s easily enough to cover most people’s needs.

We’d say this is optimistic and suggest that in typical use the standard 24kWh Leaf has a range of 60-90 miles, and the new 30kWh model has a range of 70-110 miles depending on ambient temperature and how you drive. Anyway, the 30kWh version clearly has a significant improvement in range and we would recommend it to most customers.

The Acenta is the mid-range model of the Leaf, the Tekna is the top-end model.

Nissan Leaf (Image: Autocar)
Nissan Leaf (Image: Autocar)

These are the current Leaf monthly prices (from 1 July):

Annual MileageAcenta 24kWhAcenta 30kWhTekna 24kWhTekna 30kWhFuel Included Mileage
3,000£252£283£285£317All
5,000£257£288£290£32310,000
6,000£260£292£294£32710,000
7,500£264£297£299£33210,000
9,000£268£299.90£304£33710,000
10,500£272£305£308£34210,000
12,000£276£309£312£34610,000
15,000£284£317£321£35510,000

The other terms are as follows:

  • You pay a deposit of £500 when you order.
  • Nissan make a deposit contribution of £5000.
  • Fuel included: you get 10,000 miles of free electricity over the term (this is at the Economy 7 rate though you are not required to switch to Economy 7)
  • You get free road tax and congestion charge exemption.
  • Nissan will help arrange installation of a home charge point but you will need to make a contribution to its cost (typically £195). You now get a free charge point.
  • You get free telephone and email support.
  • The standard colour is Flame Red (metallic paint adds about £17 per month – contact us for details)
  • The prices include the battery
  • If you were to go over the agreed mileage you would pay excess mileage

Full details of what’s included are on the Fuel Included offer page.

Contact Us

Nissan Leaf Spec

The Acenta version of the Leaf has a high specification, including:

  • Audio centre (CD, Bluetooth, iPod, USB) with 4 speakers and steering wheel controls
  • Electric windows and mirrors
  • Auto air conditioning
  • Home charging cable and rapid charging socket
  • Halogen headlamps, fog lamps, Thatcham alarm, immobiliser, daytime running lights
  • Tyre pressure monitoring system
  • 16″ alloy wheels
  • Privacy glass
  • Nissan Carwings telematics system with 7″ colour screen and 6 speakers
  • Cruise control/speed limiter
  • Auto wipers and lights

For more information download the latest Nissan LEAF Brochure.

Contact Us

 

Coverage: We have bases and suppliers in Milton Keynes, St Albans, Northampton, Bedford and Leicester allowing us to supply all around the Midlands (including London, Luton, Oxford, Rugby, Kettering, Coventry, Nottingham and Birmingham). However we can deliver via Nissan Retail Group dealerships all around the country – just contact us for details.

Longer Range Nissan Leaf 30kWh Available – Acenta

We recently started supplying the new longer range 30kWh Leaf in the Tekna model. However, we now have prices for the mid-range, and therefore less expensive, Acenta model; details and prices are below.

Nissan Leaf (Image: Autocar)
Nissan Leaf (Image: Autocar)

We offer the Acenta (30kWh) on 3 year PCP; this stands for Personal Contract Purchase and is currently the most popular way to buy a car because of its flexibility. You put down a low deposit, pay an affordable monthly fee (less than many people spend just on petrol), and drive away a new car with fuel included. At the end of the term you can choose to pay an optional lump sum and keep the car, or you can just give the car back and upgrade to the latest model.

It’s like a mobile phone contract, but with miles rather than minutes included.

These are the current prices (from 27 May 2016):

  • 3000 miles per year: £260 per month, all fuel (9000 miles) included
  • 5000 miles per year: £266 per month, 10000 miles fuel included
  • 6000 miles per year: £269 per month, 10000 miles fuel included
  • 7500 miles per year: £274 per month, 10000 miles fuel included
  • 9000 miles per year: £278 per month, 10000 miles fuel included
  • 10500 miles per year: £283 per month, 10000 miles fuel included
  • 12000 miles per year: £287 per month, 10000 miles fuel included
  • 15000 miles per year: £296 per month, 10000 miles fuel included

Regarding range, Nissan says:

With an NEDC range of up to 124 miles (LEAF 24kWh) or up to 155 miles (LEAF 30kWh), it’s easily enough to cover most people’s needs.

We’d say this is optimistic and suggest the standard 24kWh Leaf has a range of 60-90 miles, and the new 30kWh model has a range of 70-110 miles depending on ambient temperature and how you drive. Anyway, it clearly has a significant improvement in range and we would recommend the 30kWh model to most customers.

Contact Us

If you want to know more we have collected a number of public reviews here.

2134229022_Nissan_Leaf_eCar

The other terms are as follows:

  • There’s an initial customer payment (‘deposit’) of £500 when you order.
  • Nissan make a deposit contribution of £5000.
  • Interest on the finance is 3.99% APR.
  • Fuel included: you get 10000 miles of free electricity over the three years (this is at the Economy 7 rate but you are not required to switch to Economy 7).
  • You get free road tax and congestion charge exemption.
  • You get free telephone and email support.
  • The standard colour is Flame Red (other colours add about £16 per month, contact us for details).
  • If you were to go over the agreed mileage on your PCP you would pay excess mileage as usual.
Contact Us

 

Coverage: We have bases and suppliers in Milton Keynes, St Albans, Northampton, Bedford and Leicester allowing us to supply all around the Midlands (including London, Luton, Oxford, Rugby, Kettering, Coventry, Nottingham and Birmingham). However we can deliver via Nissan Retail Group dealerships all around the country – just contact us for details.

Nissan Leaf (Image: Autocar)

Longer Range Nissan Leaf 30kWh Available – Tekna

As well as the standard 24kWh Leaf we can now supply the longer range 30kWh Leaf. As the name implies, the battery is 25% larger so it has about 25% more range. Nissan says:

With an NEDC range of up to 124 miles (LEAF 24kWh) or up to 155 miles (LEAF 30kWh), it’s easily enough to cover most people’s needs.

We’d say this is optimistic and suggest the standard 24kWh Leaf has a range of 60-90 miles, and the new 30kWh model has a range of 70-110 miles. Anyway, it clearly has a significant improvement in range and we would recommend the 30kWh model to most customers.

Contact Us

 

Nissan Leaf (Image: Autocar)
Nissan Leaf (Image: Autocar)

If you want to know more we have collected a number of public reviews here.

2134229022_Nissan_Leaf_eCar

Here’s an example quote for the top-end Tekna 6.6 model (which includes a 6.6kW fast charger option) on 3 year PCP. If you’re interested in the 30kWh battery on the mid-range Acenta model, see here.

  • 7000 miles per year: £330 per month for 35 months.
  • There’s an initial customer payment (‘deposit’) of £500 when you order.
  • Nissan make a deposit contribution of £5000.
  • Interest on the finance is 3.99% APR.
  • Fuel included: you get 10000 miles of free electricity over the three years (this is at the Economy 7 rate but you are not required to switch to Economy 7).
  • You get free road tax and congestion charge exemption.
  • You get free telephone and email support.
  • The standard colour is Flame Red (other colours add about £15 per month, contact us for details).
  • If you were to go over the agreed mileage you would pay excess mileage.
Contact Us
2016 Nissan Leaf 30kWh

Car review: 2016 Nissan Leaf 30kWh

A longer range for one of the first electric cars on the market could be what it takes for buyers to conquer their EV anxiety

2016 Nissan Leaf 30kWh
2016 Nissan Leaf 30kWh

As more and more electric vehicles come on to the market, Nissan has upped the Leaf’s game in terms of the thing that matters most – range.

This new 30kWh model runs a denser battery pack than the existing 24kWh version, giving it a claimed range of 155 miles. That’s a 25% improvement, and it gives the newcomer a place at the top of the Leaf range.

Available only in Acenta and Tekna trim, it costs from £30,935 – though that’s before the government’s EV grant contribution is taken off.

Our test vehicle was a Tekna, so it featured 17” alloys, heated seats, a premium stereo and more on top of the Acenta’s climate, rear-view camera, sat-nav and EV-specific telematic system.

Despite all the kit, though, the interior suffers from being trimmed out in plastics that are hard to the touch and all too often not very nice. That’s a shame, because it’s otherwise comfortable and, on the move, impressively refined.

Drivetrain noise is negligible, of course, but that just creates the risk of wind rustle and tyre roar taking its place. These are never offensive, however, even at high speed – and neither is ride quality, which was particularly good on every kind of road we could find.

As always with electric cars, initial pull is very strong indeed. But mid-range is a little lethargic, so it’s never much fun when you need to accelerate past a slower vehicle. Cars like the Leaf are most popular with people who do a lot of urban driving, however, and in this environment it’s in its element.

A longer range means this Leaf wants to tempt you out of the city, but it’ll take time before Motorway Man starts seeing such cars as a viable alternative to his mile-muncher.

Still, what we’re witnessing here is another step along that route. Dealing with range anxiety is a big issue for EV makers, and that’s what Nissan is doing with this new model.

They’ve addressed another kind of worry by upping the warranty on the Leaf’s batteries for eight years or 100,000 miles, too. All of which will help knock down the walls in people’s minds.

Source: Wharf

The Leaf 30kWh has an official range of 155 miles - with 124 miles of real world range

Nissan Leaf 30kWh UK launch

Next Green Car was invited along to the UK launch of the Nissan Leaf 30kWh at Silverstone yesterday (Tuesday 26th January), giving us another chance at an early test for the new longer-range model.

The Leaf 30kWh has an official range of 155 miles - with 124 miles of real world range
The Leaf 30kWh has an official range of 155 miles – with 124 miles of real world range

With around 12,000 UK sales, the current Leaf is the best selling electric vehicle (EV) on the market and has played an important part in increasing the growth of plug-in vehicles in the country. Since its UK launch in 2011, the Leaf has been been joined by the likes of the Renault Zoe, BMW i3, and VW’s e-Golf and e-up! in terms of pure-electric models, and a number of plug-in hybrid vehicles also to increase ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV) sales dramatically in the last five years.

As a market leader then, Nissan is keen to maintain its position as a familiar EV manufacturer to the general public, and this new version of the Leaf shows its commitment to improving the offering available to consumers.

The previous generation of Leaf – the 24kWh battery model – had a quoted range of 124 miles, and a real world ability to cover around 99 miles on a single charge. The 30kWh model extends that official range to 155 miles which, although it is highly unlikely that drivers will ever achieve this figure, the real world range only drops to 124 miles – or the official range of the previous model.

When we attended the European launch towards the end of last year, we had an extended and challenging test route set up which took us up into the Alpes Maritime, with some long climbing making the range plummet before a downward section that saw us recuperate a large amount of energy. This tested the Leaf’s range to extremes and it coped very well, averaging some impressive figures. However, it was worth seeing how well the new Leaf would do on a cold and wet January morning in Britain, with muddy surfaces, pot-holes and a wide range of different roads available to deal with.

In terms of testing the biggest change to the Leaf – the increased range – the Nissan again performed well. The route was less obviously demanding, there are no mountains to climb in Northamptonshire after all, but conditions and roads represented a far more typical journey.

The car we were allocated came with a full charge and an indicated 99 miles worth of range. This low figure was explained by both a cold night and, of greater impact, the fact that the car had been used for press images the previous day, with the Leaf having weighted its indicated range to some spirited driving.

Deciding to treat the Leaf without any deference normally due to an EV, we set off on the route and drove exactly as if we were in a petrol or diesel model. The only difference was the use of the Leaf’s Eco button once acceleration was completed and we were largely up to speed. This meant sitting at around 70 mph on dual carriageways and motorways for about a third of the 55 mile route.

Read more: Next Green Car

Nissan Leaf 30kWh Tekna (2016) review

The electric Nissan Leaf now has a greater range thanks to a boosted 30kWh battery pack. But is a bigger charge enough to tempt you away from cheaper, conventional petrol and diesel hatchbacks that don’t suffer from range anxiety in the first place?

0_nissan_leaf01_CM

Read our first drive review to find out whether – five years after becoming the first credibly mainstream EV – it can still make a viable argument for the silent but saintly genre.

What’s new on the 2016 Nissan Leaf?

The Leaf has evolved slowly since launch in 2010, gaining a tidier interior here, cleverer electronics there, and now a bigger charge capacity to stretch the (theoretical) range by as much as a quarter. Nissan claims the 30kWh battery pack means you can now drive up to 155 miles on a single charge.

The battery is the same size as the old one, but weighs around 21kg more, thanks to a different cell architecture inside and uprated power management systems on top. Buyers can still choose the cheaper 24kWh Leaf if they prefer.

There’s a refreshed 7in touchscreen multimedia system, too, and Nissan has overhauled its smartphone app, rebranding it NissanConnect EV and adding new features such as guidance to the nearest unused charging stations. You can still remotely warm your Leaf up from the breakfast table – handy for those cold winter mornings. Relying on electricity for heat means it defrosts in a jiffy.

How does the new Leaf EV drive?

The Leaf hasn’t changed much since we first drove it earlier this decade; the car is still a paragon of saintly silence – wafting quietly around city streets, the soft, floaty ride smothering away the worst road acne rolling under those eco-tilted Dunlop Enasave 215/50 R17 tyres. There are few more relaxing cars to drive.

Read more: Car Magazine

Fully Charged Checks Out Longer Range 30 kWh Nissan LEAF – Video Review

Nissan recently demonstrated the new 30 kWh LEAF to journalists in France.

Among the various media outlets was Fully Charged with Robert Llewellyn impressed by the longer range LEAF.

According to latest episode, it’s worth buying the 30 kWh version, as you’ll definitely notice the difference in range compared to 24 kWh – reasonably about 110-120 miles (107 miles EPA).

“A wonderful drive up a mountain in the South of France in the newly released 30kWh Nissan Leaf. No question, it’s a big improvement in terms of range and driver interface.

A bigger battery that’s not physically bigger, just 25% more energy dense.”

Source: Inside EVs