Category Archives: Nissan

News and reviews of Nissan electric cars (including plug-in hybrids).

Electric Car Day – A great Success for our Milton Keynes Multi-Car Test Drive Event

With support from Nissan, Renault and BMW, we hosted our first Milton Keynes multi-brand electric car day at our offices in Milton Keynes.

In a packed two and a half hours of pre-booked drives over twenty people enjoyed the thrills and spills of electric car driving, with 2 Nissan Leafs, 2 BMW i3’s, 1 Renault ZOE and one Nissan EV-200 electric van.

This is the first of many. Please contact us if you have an office that would benefit from a multi-car test drive event.

Facebook Live Video from a BMW i3 test drive

Video walkaround of a couple of our Cars available for test

Leaf, i3 and EV-200

 

Multi-Car Test Drive in Milton Keynes – This Friday 28th April 12pm – 2pm

FuelIncluded have organised a test drive day this Friday in Milton Keynes.

We shall have the three best-selling all-electric cars here; Nissan Leaf, Renault ZOE and the BMW i3.

Multi-car test-drive

Please contact us now if you would like to drive one or more of these great cars at a single, convenient location, with experts on hand to discuss and ask questions of.

Renault Zoe vs rivals – cost analysis

We’re all pretty clued-up about the benefits to zero-emission driving these days. Not only do electric cars help to improve air quality, lower your SMR costs and bring a reduction in BIK tax bills, they also deliver huge savings by not relying on fuel.

According to many experts, we are now getting very close to mass adoption of electric cars here in the UK. But they’re still a niche choice for many fleets because higher P11D prices and anxieties over range remain key stumbling blocks.

A whole-life cost approach is essential and, as discussed in the previous pages, they have to be fit for purpose to provide enough savings to outweigh the initial cost. But technology is improving at a considerable rate and battery ranges are increasing with every update.

The Renault Zoe

Refreshed in 2016, now offers an official 250-mile range – the best the sector has to offer, Tesla aside.

According to the French carmaker, if you use the most efficient means possible, like charging at night, running a Zoe could cost as little as 2p per mile in warmer weather, rising to 3ppm when the nights draw in. As well as offering the best range of our four cars here, the Zoe is also the cheapest to buy with P11D prices starting as low as £18,440. Despite some disappointing residual values, which are a common theme for most electric cars currently, the Zoe is the cheapest per mile too, costing 52.9p.

Renault Zoe Dynamique Nav 41kWh R90 – 52.2p CPM
P11D: £27,890
CO2 (tax): 0g/km (7%)
BIK 20/40% per month: £33/£65
Official range: 250 miles
National Insurance: £1,116
Boot space: 338 litres
Battery size/power: 41kW/92hp
0-62mph: 13.5 seconds
Residual value: 18.7%/£5,225
Fuel costs: £600
SMR: £890

Nissan Leaf

The biggest-selling electric car here in the UK by some margin, the Nissan Leaf also had a battery upgrade in 2016, which saw its range increase up to 155 miles.

Not only is the Leaf the most popular of our models here, it’s also the most practical, offering a 355-litre boot and the most interior space. The Nissan is also easy to drive and comfortable over longer distances.

Nissan Leaf Acenta 30kWh
P11D: £30,235
CO2 (tax): 0g/km (7%)
BIK 20/40% per month: £35/£71
Official range: 153 miles
National Insurance: £1,210
Boot space: 355 litres
Battery size/power: 30kW/111hp
0-62mph: 11.5 seconds
Residual value: 16.9%/£5,100
Fuel costs: £980
SMR: £1,029

BMW i3

First launched in 2013, the i3 not only marked the start of BMW’s EV model range, it also moved the game forwards considerably for electric car technology as a whole. It was a game-changer in every sense, and although it’s struggled to gain momentum in sales against its rivals, the i3 has remained one of the most desirable and technologically advanced electric cars on the market.

A battery update in 2016 doubled the car’s range to 195 miles officially on one charge, although the carmaker believes 125 miles is more realistic in real-world conditions, plus the i3 is also fitted with a new charging system that is 50% faster.

BMW i3 94ah eDrive
P11D: £32,485
CO2 (tax): 0g/km (7%)
BIK 20/40% per month: £38/£76
Official range: 195 miles
National Insurance: £1,300
Boot space: 260 litres
Battery size/power: 33kW/170hp
0-62mph: 7.3 seconds
Residual value: 30.2%/£9,825
Fuel costs: £1,200
SMR: £1,216

Hyundai IONIQ

The first car to be available in hybrid, plug-in hybrid and electric forms, the Ioniq moved Hyundai into new territory when the car was launched last year. It’s all part of the firm’s plans to have as many as 28 eco-friendly models on sale by 2020.

Arguably the most eye-catching of the four cars, the Ioniq also has one of the biggest boots, and its official 174-mile range is one of the best on offer here too. RVs, as we explained earlier, leave a lot to be desired for EVs in general; however, the Ioniq still manages to better both the Zoe and Leaf at 20.3%, and only the Renault is cheaper per mile for whole-life costs.

Hyundai Ioniq Premium
P11D: £28,940
CO2 (tax): 0g/km (7%)
BIK 20/40% per month: £34/£68
Official range: 174 miles
National Insurance: £1,158
Boot space: 350 litres
Battery size/power: 28kW/120hp
0-62mph: 10.2 seconds
Residual value: 20.3%/£5,875
Fuel costs: £862
SMR: £1,222

Read more: Business Car

Nissan Leaf New Prices

Nissan Leaf Offers

We are pleased to announce new priced deals for the Nissan Leaf (from 13 April 2017) – and with free fuel! The big news is that the deal includes the supply and installation of a free home charge point.

We are able to offer a brand new Nissan Leaf at very low rates allowing you to save on motoring expenses while driving away in an affordable brand new car. It’s a spacious car so ideal for a family. If you’re spending a lot on petrol, then you can pay for the car with what you save on fuel. You get to drive a new car for free!

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We are offering the Nissan Leaf Acenta and Tekna (each in 24kWh and 30kWh versions) on 3 year PCP; this stands for Personal Contract Purchase and is currently the most popular way to buy a car because of its flexibility. You put down a low deposit, pay an affordable monthly fee (less than many people spend just on petrol), and drive away a new car with fuel included. At the end of the term you can choose to pay an optional lump sum and keep the car, or you can just give the car back and upgrade to the latest model.

It’s like a mobile phone contract, but with miles rather than minutes included.

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The two versions have different sizes of battery and so have different ranges. Regarding this, Nissan says:

With an NEDC range of up to 124 miles (LEAF 24kWh) or up to 155 miles (LEAF 30kWh), it’s easily enough to cover most people’s needs.

We’d say this is optimistic and suggest that in typical use the standard 24kWh Leaf has a range of 60-90 miles, and the new 30kWh model has a range of 70-110 miles depending on ambient temperature and how you drive. Anyway, the 30kWh version clearly has a significant improvement in range and we would recommend it to most customers.

The Acenta is the mid-range model of the Leaf, the Tekna is the top-end model.

Nissan Leaf (Image: Autocar)
Nissan Leaf (Image: Autocar)

These are the current Leaf monthly prices (from 13 April):

Annual MileageAcenta 24kWhAcenta 30kWhTekna 24kWhTekna 30kWhFuel Included Mileage
5,000£215£227£229£24110,000
8,000£224£236£238£25110,000
10,000£229£243£244£25710,000
15,000£241£256£256£27210,000
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The other terms are as follows:

  • You pay a deposit of £999 when you order.
  • Fuel included: you get 10,000 miles of free electricity over the term (this is at the Economy 7 rate though you are not required to switch to Economy 7).
  • You get free road tax and congestion charge exemption.
  • Nissan will arrange installation of a free home charge point.
  • You get free telephone and email support.
  • The standard colour is Solid Red (metallic paint adds about £17 per month – contact us for details).
  • The prices include the battery.
  • If you were to go over the agreed mileage you would pay excess mileage of about 10p/mile.

Full details of what’s included are on the Fuel Included offer page.

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Nissan Leaf Spec

The Acenta version of the Leaf has a high specification, including:

  • Audio centre (CD, Bluetooth, iPod, USB) with 4 speakers and steering wheel controls
  • Electric windows and mirrors
  • Auto air conditioning
  • Home charging cable and rapid charging socket
  • Halogen headlamps, fog lamps, Thatcham alarm, immobiliser, daytime running lights
  • Tyre pressure monitoring system
  • 16″ alloy wheels
  • Privacy glass
  • Nissan Carwings telematics system with 7″ colour screen and 6 speakers
  • Cruise control/speed limiter
  • Auto wipers and lights

 

The Tekna version adds the following:

  • Heated front and rear seats
  • Heated steering wheel
  • Heated door mirrors
  • BOSE audio system with 7 speakers
  • 360 degree Around View Monitor
  • Black leather interior
  • LED headlights with ‘follow me home’ function
  • 17″ alloy wheels
  • Privacy glass

 

For more information download the latest Nissan LEAF Brochure.

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Coverage: We have bases and suppliers in Milton Keynes, St Albans, Northampton, Bedford and Leicester allowing us to supply all around the Midlands (including London, Luton, Oxford, Rugby, Kettering, Coventry, Nottingham and Birmingham). However we can deliver via Nissan Retail Group dealerships all around the country – just contact us for details.

 

 

 

eVolt charge points support new fleet of EVs at Taxi Central

eVolt, the Electric Vehicle (EV) charge point supplier, has completed the installation of three chargers to assist a Kirkcaldy-based taxi business in achieving its environmental ambitions and support its five new private hire Nissan Leaf EVs, which are now fully operational.

Taxi Central has installed one of eVolt’s Rapid Chargers, which can charge the 30kWh Nissan Leafs to 80% battery life in 30 minutes, to provide on-shift EVs with essential charging capability; and two eVolt AC 7kW Wall-mount Chargers that fully charge the EVs in around 5 hours.

Nissan Leaf charging at an Evolt Charge Point (image: Evolt)

“This charging structure is working excellently, and ensures that our new EVs are well-supported,”

says Mike Brown, Owner of Taxi Central. “We are a 24-hour business and conscious of our environmental foot print. EVs are cheaper to run in the long-term and have a lower maintenance cost, particularly since our taxis travel over 1,000 miles a week.

“eVolt’s chargers are high quality and very reliable, the installation was efficient, and its support network of local engineers gives me peace of mind that should there be a problem, it will be quickly resolved,”

he adds.

The funding for the charge points came through the Energy Saving Trust (EST) and Transport Scotland, and eVolt achieved its status on the latest EST Scotland-wide charge point framework in 2016.

Matthew Eastwood, Head of Transport – Scotland at EST, says EST is pleased to have provided grant funding on behalf of Transport Scotland to support this installation:

“By facilitating the introduction of EVs into the Taxi Central fleet, these charge points will help Kirkcaldy’s residents experience the benefits of EVs, reduce their exposure to harmful emissions and support the Scottish Government’s aim of decarbonising Scotland’s road transport.”

Stephen Rennie, Business Development Manager – Scotland at eVolt, says the Private Hire and Taxi market is one in which eVolt is enjoying considerable success: “More and more businesses are bringing EVs into their fleets as they are seeing its benefits in affordability and sustainability.

“Firms like Taxi Central understand and appreciate that eVolt chargers perform reliably and quickly when used multiple times, and help protect the environment as well as revenues.”

Source: Plug-in Magazine 

Nissan Electric Vehicles for a more resilient world

Nissan Intelligent Mobility is the brand’s blueprint for the future of motoring, targeting zero emissions and zero fatalities. It was first announced exactly a year ago, at the 2016 Geneva Motor Show. Since then, significant progress has been made under all three of its pillars – Intelligent Driving, covering advances on how cars are driven; Intelligent Power, which guides developments on how they are powered; and Intelligent Integration, a wider investment strategy on the role vehicles play in society.

 

Mexicans Lining up Electric to Beat Pollution

On a trip to Mexico City this week, I have just seen a lovely sight. A long row of all-electric Nissan Leafs lined up in a taxi rank ready to start the day.

Electric Taxi Rank in Mexico City

If you have ever been to Mexico City, then you will know that air pollution is a major issue here, as it is now becoming in all large cities. The taxi rank is not yet a full solution, and the city is still filled with diesels and petrol guzzlers blasting out noxious fumes, but it is a step in the right direction. I hope for many more.

A Look Around my New Nissan Leaf 30 kWh

I just took delivery of my new long range Nissan Leaf and I love it.

Check out the short video. This is the Tekna and the interior shots show the nice leather (heated) seats front and back, and the roomy boot.

New stuff I have noticed:

  • The extra range is wonderful.
  • DAB radio is great and the software interface is much improved.
  • It tucks in the wing mirrors automatically when you lock it.
  • It comes with both 13A and type 2 charge cable as default.
  • It seems to accelerate a little quicker than before in normal mode (in spite of the extra battery weight).
  • It seems to accelerate a little slower in eco mode. I guess that is good for eco.
  • Gun Metal grey looks fantastic.

A Mother’s Tale of Electric Cars

I love my electric car! It’s nippy and smooth to drive, all at the same time. Somehow it seems to glide effortlessly along and I can weave in and out of traffic very easily. I use it for all my local errands – family shop, trips to the gym, plus the never-ending Mum-taxi drop offs and pick ups……At night, I plug it in when I finally get home and it is fully charged the next day, ready to go.

Nissan Leaf – a Perfect Family Car

I rarely use up more more than 30% of the battery going about my usual day, so I don’t really have any concerns about the battery life. It took a little getting used to on longer journeys into London – I learned to drive just a little bit slower to conserve the battery – although when we get our new Nissan Leaf next week, it will have a longer range and I can then really put my foot down😉. The free congestion charge and almost free parking in Westminster always make up for the extra 5 minutes in the car!

Most of all, I enjoy the engine quietness and the ‘smug value’ that comes from knowing that I am doing the right thing for my children by not adding more polluting emissions to the earth’s atmosphere. On top of that, it makes financial sense – a new car (let me say that again, a new car – I have NEVER had a new car before!) for just a little more per month than we previously paid for fuel. It’s a no-brainer for me.

Nissan Leaf

Car Tax, the new VED rules explained

An overhaul of UK car tax rules will increase the cost of motoring – but not if you’re buying a Nissan LEAF

On April 1, the system for taxing new cars in the UK, known as Vehicle Excise Duty (VED), is being radically overhauled (click here for details). The revamp will make it more expensive to run certain types of low-emissions cars – but the Nissan LEAF, the world’s best-selling electric car, will remain exempt from tax.

Nissan Leaf

If you’re confused by the changes, or uncertain of what they mean if you’re considering buying a new car, here’s a quick guide.

How car tax works now

The amount of VED you currently pay is based on your car’s CO2 emissions. There are 13 VED bands: vehicles that emit between 0 and 130g/km of CO2 (think electric vehicles and certain hybrids) don’t pay any VED in their first year. After that, vehicles that emit 101-120g/km of CO2 have to pay between £10 and £30. The duty jumps from there, to at least £100 for cars that emit 121g/km of CO2 or more.

What’s changing

From April 1, only vehicles that produce no emissions while driving, such as the Nissan LEAF, will be exempt from VED in year one. Vehicles that produce 1-50 g/km of CO2 pay £10; those that emit 51-75 g/km pay £25. VED then leaps to £100 for vehicles that emit 76-90 g/km. From year two on, CO2-producing vehicles costing less than £40,000 pay an annual rate of £140 – with a £310 premium for cars that cost more than £40,000.

Zero emissions, zero tax

Cars that produce 0g/km of CO2 and cost less than £40,000 will remain exempt from VED for their lifetime. The fully-equipped, five-seat electric Nissan LEAF falls into that category – and it’s also exempt from congestion charges. So as well as fuel costs of as little as 2p a mile, buying a safe and reliable LEAF could save you hundreds of pounds in tax.

When it comes to fuel efficiency, the British-built Nissan LEAF remains ahead of the pack – because it uses no combustible fuel at all.

Read more: What Car?