Category Archives: i3 94Ah

BMW i3 in Fluid Black (Image: BMW.co.uk)

New BMW i3 PCP Prices

BMW i3 Personal Contract Purchase (PCP) Deals

We have new deals available from 21 February for private buyers looking to buy the new longer-range BMW i3.

BMW i3 'Stormtrooper' (Image: BMW)
BMW i3 ‘Stormtrooper’ (Image: BMW)

We are offering a BMW i3 (94Ah) auto hatchback on 2, 3  or 4 year PCP (Personal Contract Purchase – like a lease you can give the car back at the end, but you also have the option of paying a lump sum and keeping it). To keep these prices low, there is no Fuel Included service as standard. However, you do get the usual free car tax (for the BEV version) and congestion charge exemption as well as often free public parking and charging.

These are the current prices for a 3 year term with a deposit of £1250:

Miles Per YearBattery Electric (BEV)Range Extender (REx)
8,000£380£411
10,000£389£421
12,000£399£432
15,000£413£449
20,000£437£476
Contact Us

 

The i3 is a very exciting car – arguably the most advanced in the world being 100% electric and the only mass production car made with a carbon fibre frame (plus aluminium chassis and plastic body panels). We have selected news and reviews (and blogging about our own i3) to read here.

A battery upgrade for the BMW i3 sees range almost doubled
The BMW i3 (94Ah) in the new Protonic Blue colour

A unique feature of the i3 is that it comes in two versions:

  • As a Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) – the car just uses electricity from the battery to drive and you recharge it as necessary.
  • With a Range Extender (REx) – as an option the i3 can have a small petrol engine fitted under the boot which recharges the battery when it runs lows on charge.

In both cases we provide the longer range version of the i3 battery known as the ’94Ah’ (which relates to the specification of the battery cells). Where the previous i3 battery had a range of 70-90 miles this new battery has a range of 120-140 miles. In the case of the REx version (with its engine and 9 litre petrol tank) the total range is over 200 miles.

The other offer terms are as follows:

  • Prices shown include VAT.
  • Prices are for a standard car with solid paint, with or without REx – ask us to quote for other options such as automatic cruise control and automatic parking.
  • Maintenance is not included.
  • The excess mileage fee is 8p to 10p per mile, depending on contract terms.
  • You get free road tax for the BEV and congestion charge exemption for both versions.
  • While benefits for electric cars are changing, currently you get cheap charging on motorways and many public locations, plus free parking in many town centres and railway stations.
Contact Us
BMW i3 interior: Lodge interior world with standard Eucalyptus trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)

Choosing the Interior for Your BMW i3

When ordering a new BMW i3 it’s important not just that you get the right exterior paint colour but that you get an interior that complements it and that you’re happy with.

BMW i3 in Fluid Black (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 in Fluid Black (Image: BMW.co.uk)

Prices for i3 on PCP

Prices for i3 on Business Lease

To be honest BMW don’t make interior selection easy in the sense that you might expect to be able to just choose a fabric and a colour. Instead there is a standard interior plus three optional (i.e. extra cost) interior arrangements; BMW refer to these interiors as ‘worlds’.

 

These worlds have a choice of trims (essentially the dashboard inlay material):

  • Andesit Silver matt (Atelier only)
  • Dark Andesit matt (Loft only)
  • Eucalyptus matt (any world but Atelier)
  • Oak dark matt (any world but Atelier)

 

The four ‘worlds’ are as follows:

  • Atelier (standard) interior world: Neutronic cloth with Andesit Silver trim
  • Lodge interior world: Solaric climate active wool/leather, standard trim is Eucalyptus
  • Loft interior world: Electronic cloth/Sensatec artificial leather, standard trim is Dark Andesit
  • Suite interior world: Stellaric natural leather, standard trim is Oak

 

There are therefore a total of 8 different world/trim options; these are illustrated below (click to enlarge).

BMW i3 interior: Atelier interior world with Andesit Silver trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Atelier interior world with Andesit Silver trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Lodge interior world with standard Eucalyptus trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Lodge interior world with standard Eucalyptus trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Lodge interior world with optional Oak trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Lodge interior world with optional Oak trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Loft interior world with standard Dark Andesit trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Loft interior world with standard Dark Andesit trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Loft interior world with optional Eucalyptus trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Loft interior world with optional Eucalyptus trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Loft interior world with optional Oak trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Loft interior world with optional Oak trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Suite interior world with standard Oak trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Suite interior world with standard Oak trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Suite interior world with optional Eucalyptus trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)
BMW i3 interior: Suite interior world with optional Eucalyptus trim (Image: BMW.co.uk)

Hyundai Ioniq, Volkswagen E-Golf, BMW i3 vs Nissan Leaf

The Hyundai Ioniq Electric is the latest addition to a growing class of city-friendly battery-powered hatchbacks. We pit it against its rivals

The electric vehicle market is growing, so we’ve collected the Hyundai Ioniq, Volkswagen E-Golf, BMW i3 and Nissan Leaf together to see which comes out on top.

Hyundai Ioniq, Volkswagen E-Golf, BMW i3 vs Nissan Leaf - electric vehicle group test (Image: Autocar)
Hyundai Ioniq, Volkswagen E-Golf, BMW i3 vs Nissan Leaf – electric vehicle group test (Image: Autocar)

A watched EV never boils. More to the point, it doesn’t bleep, flash, pop, ping or do anything else that you might imagine an all-electric hatchback ought to do to indicate a completed charge. Shame. I like the idea of a Nissan Leaf gradually browning, wafting warm toast smells in every direction, before spontaneously hopping three feet into the air like a slice of Warburton’s ready for the butter knife.

It would at least make an interesting spectacle in the motorway services car park in which we’re now waiting. We’ve got four brand-new battery cars lined up in front of Ecotricity’s fast chargers, each suckling almost noiselessly in turn from the national grid, before setting off on an exercise we’ve been waiting a long time to carry out.

It was six years ago that the Nissan Leaf and Mitsubishi i-MiEV first tested the appetite of drivers all over the developed world for a compact, affordable electric hatchback. It’s an appetite that’s needed plenty of encouragement, but it’s finally growing at something close to the rate those evangelical early market entrants had hoped for. Viewed globally, the market for pure EVs and plug-in hybrids will total more than 600,000 cars this year, up about 50% year on year. Just over half of all those ‘plug-in’ cars sold this year will be wholly electric-powered.

More important, as concerns today’s agenda, the all-electric hatchback market now provides the UK motorist with enough choice to populate a full Autocar group test. Welcome, then, the new Hyundai Ioniq Electric to UK showrooms. And allow us to introduce it to the similarly priced, all-electric rivals against which its stature must be measured: the Nissan Leaf, Volkswagen e-Golf and BMW i3.

Having followed the early-stage development of these zero-emissions pioneers, we’ve become used to the strengths and limitations of electric propulsion at the affordable end of the ownership spectrum. An £80,000 Tesla may already offer the sort of cruising range it takes to replace internal combustion in a car for almost any occasion or journey, but a £25,000 Leaf doesn’t – and probably won’t for a few years yet.

Where affordable EVs have already shown strength is when performing as responsive, relaxing, cost-efficient short-range transport, in the role typically served by the second car in a family. And that’s how we’re going to test today’s field. We’ve plotted a route across north London, taking in some of its most congested streets and winding up at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Newham. We simply want to know which of these cars would serve you best with predominantly urban use in mind.

Before we set off, time for a quick poke around our newbie: the Hyundai Ioniq. The Leaf, i3 and e-Golf are well known to us, all having been the subject of Autocar road tests over the past few years and all serving customers looking for slightly different things from their first EV. And rather than competing for exactly the same customers as any of its new-found rivals, the Ioniq definitely adds to the breadth of choice in the market.

Read more: Autocar

Longer Range BMW i3 on Business Lease

BMW i3 Business Lease Offers

We have new deals available from 24 January to 21 February for businesses looking to lease the new longer range BMW i3.

BMW i3 'Stormtrooper' (Image: BMW)
BMW i3 ‘Stormtrooper’ (Image: BMW)

We are offering a BMW i3 (94Ah) auto hatchback on 3 year BCH (Business Contract Hire – effectively a long term rental) with 3 months of upfront payment on a 3 year term (so ‘3+35’). As these are business leases, there is no Fuel Included service as standard. However, you do get the usual free car tax (for the BEV version) and congestion charge exemption as well as often free public parking and charging.

These are the current prices (with the lowest ones highlighted):

Battery Electric (BEV)Range Extender (REx)
Payment Terms:6+353+356+353+35
6,000 miles pa£258£280£285£309
10,000 miles pa£272£295£300£326
15,000 miles pa£293£318£325£352
Contact Us

 

The i3 is a very exciting car – arguably the most advanced in the world being 100% electric and the only mass production car made with a carbon fibre frame (plus aluminium chassis and plastic body panels). We have selected news and reviews (and blogging about our own i3) to read here.

A battery upgrade for the BMW i3 sees range almost doubled
The new BMW i3 (94Ah) in the new Protonic Blue colour

A unique feature of the i3 is that it comes in two versions:

  • As a Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) – the car just uses electricity from the battery to drive and you recharge it as necessary.
  • With a Range Extender (REx) – as an option the i3 can have a small petrol engine fitted under the boot which recharges the battery when it runs lows on charge.

In both cases we only provide the longer range version of the i3 battery known as the ’94Ah’ (which relates to the specification of the battery cells). Where the previous i3 battery had a range of 70-90 miles this new battery has a range of 120-140 miles. In the case of the REx version (with its engine and 9 litre petrol tank) the total range is over 200 miles.

The other offer terms are as follows:

  • Prices shown exclude VAT.
  • Prices are for a standard car (solid paint, options as listed) – ask us to quote for other options such as automatic cruise control and automatic parking.
  • Maintenance is not included.
  • You get free road tax for the BEV and congestion charge exemption for both versions.
  • While benefits for electric cars are changing, currently you get cheap charging on motorways and many public locations, plus free parking in many town centres and railway stations.
Contact Us

PCP Prices for New Longer Range BMW i3

We have new deals available from 14 January to 31 March for private buyers looking to buy the new longer-range BMW i3.

A battery upgrade for the BMW i3 sees range almost doubled
The BMW i3 (94Ah) in the new Protonic Blue colour

We are offering a BMW i3 (94Ah) auto hatchback on 2, 3  or 4 year PCP (Personal Contract Purchase – like a lease you can give the car back at the end, but you also have the option of paying a lump sum and keeping it). To keep these prices low, there is no Fuel Included service as standard. However, you do get the usual free car tax (for the BEV version) and congestion charge exemption as well as often free public parking and charging.

The i3 is a very exciting car – arguably the most advanced in the world being 100% electric and the only mass production car made with a carbon fibre frame (plus aluminium chassis and plastic body panels). We have selected news and reviews (and blogging about our own i3) to read here.

A unique feature of the i3 is that it comes in two versions:

  • As a Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) – the car just uses electricity from the battery to drive and you recharge it as necessary.
  • With a Range Extender (REx) – as an option the i3 can have a small petrol engine fitted under the boot which recharges the battery when it runs lows on charge.

In both cases we provide the longer range version of the i3 battery known as the ’94Ah’ (which relates to the specification of the battery cells). Where the previous i3 battery had a range of 70-90 miles this new battery has a range of 120-140 miles. In the case of the REx version (with its engine and 9 litre petrol tank) the total range is over 200 miles.

These are the current prices (with the customer payments highlighted) for 10,000 miles per year:

 Battery Electric (BEV)Range Extender (REx)
10,000 miles pa£365£397
15,000 miles pa£389£424

The other terms are as follows:

  • Prices shown include VAT.
  • Prices are for a standard car (solid paint, no options) – ask us to quote for other options such as automatic cruise control and automatic parking.
  • Maintenance is not included.
  • The excess mileage fee is 8p to 10p per mile, depending on contract terms.
  • Length of agreement is 37 months.
  • You get free road tax for the BEV and congestion charge exemption for both versions.
  • While benefits for electric cars are changing, currently you get cheap charging on motorways and many public locations, plus free parking in many town centres and railway stations.
Contact Us
BMW i3 REx range extender 94AH 2016 (Image: AutoExpress)

BMW i3 94Ah Range Extender 2016 review

The updated BMW i3 is better than ever and this Range Extender makes range anxiety a thing of the past

BMW i3 REx range extender 94AH 2016 (Image: AutoExpress)
BMW i3 REx range extender 94AH 2016 (Image: AutoExpress)

Verdict: 4 stars

The BMW i3 is a more compelling proposition than ever thanks to its bigger battery pack and improved range. The pure EV version will cost pennies to run, but it’s this REx model that steals the show. Unlike conventional plug-in rivals like the VW Golf GTE, the i3 offers a truly usable electric-only range, allowing you to feasibly avoid using the petrol engine at all. Added kit like DC charging should make it even easier to live with, too.

In a world of increasingly stringent emissions regulations, more and more buyers are considering the purchase of an electric vehicle. Range anxiety remains a problem, however, with many worried about simply running out of juice.

BMW thinks it has the answer. By fitting a denser 94Ah battery pack to its funky looking i3, engineers have almost doubled the car’s all-electric range. Now capable of up to 195 miles, the BMW i3 is more than suitable for the average daily commute.

But what if that’s not enough? What if the thought of being stranded at a motorway service station without access to a plug still terrifies you? Handily, bosses have seen fit to add the bigger battery to the Range Extender model, too.

The thing is, it’s not actually any bigger. The 94Ah battery slots into the same space as the old unit – meaning this new model is only marginally heavier than the outgoing car. BMW says it’ll do 288 miles on a single charge and full tank of fuel, charging from empty to 80 per cent full in only 40 minutes.

That super-fast charge time is thanks to the fact that all i3s now get DC Rapid Charge as standard. It’ll still allow you to top up from a standard three-pin wall socket, although that’ll take around 10 hours.

On the road, the i3 drives just as it did before. It has the same playful handling as we’ve grown to expect from a BMW, while the rear-wheel propulsion gives it a sporting edge often missing on competitor cars. The two-cylinder engine feeds the batteries rather than being directly connected to the wheels, meaning you’re never driving solely on petrol power. It’s whisper quiet, too, ticking away in the background without you even noticing.

As a result, the BMW i3 always benefits from the electric motor’s instant torque. It offers pleasing acceleration (0-62mph takes 8.1 seconds) – with the ability to surprise some supercars off the line. It tails off at motorway speeds, but still feels comfortable at 70mph.

Read more: AutoExpress

i3 charging at Frimley Hospital (Image: T. Larkum)

Rapid Charging at Frimley Park Hospital

[Part 1 is here]

As expected we got most of the way to our destination in Surrey without having had a chance for a proper rapid charge. The plan was to charge at Frimley Park Hospital, and if that failed to go to Church Street car park in Fleet. Driving an EV long distance is all about having a plan and a backup plan!

i3 charging at Frimley Hospital (Image: T. Larkum)
i3 charging at Frimley Hospital (Image: T. Larkum)

We needn’t have worried – Frimley turned out fine, eventually. We knew the charge point was in the covered part of the (very large) car park and found it pretty easily. However, things did then get a bit tricky. Zap-map indicated that there were two CCS-capable charge points there, with one of them offline. In fact there was only one (the other charge point could only do AC and Chademo) and it was showing an error on the screen; naturally I was worried that this was actually the offline unit.

I cancelled the apparent charge session and re-initialised it (just following instructions on the screen) and it seemed to clear. I started a new session using my Polar RFID card (it’s a CYC charge point, but CYC is now part of Polar). When I first connected the i3 and began a charge, however, it only lasted about a minute, and then stopped with an error on the dash. Anyway, I persisted and the second time it worked fine.

We were fully charged about 45 minutes later – that was longer than I expected, particularly as we plugged in with 32% charge, so that implies to me that the charge point may not have been giving its full 50kW power (perhaps as a result of the initial failed charge?). Nonetheless, it’s hard to complain when the charge was free, and even £3 for the parking seemed reasonable as we were able to pass the time sitting in the nearby hospital cafe with a cup of tea and a slice of cake.

The charge issues and long charge time notwithstanding, it was a pretty good experience and I’m sure we’ll use Frimley again. We left with 99% charge and had enough not just to get to Surrey but to show off the i3’s acceleration a few times while there, and then return all the way back to Northampton without a further charge. Hats off to the i3 once again!

AC Rapid Charging an i3 94Ah

We’re currently on our way in the i3 from Northampton to Surrey, to visit relatives for New Year’s Eve. It seems like most of the few CCS charge points operated by Ecotricity at motorway services are offline today.

I have therefore planned to charge at public charge points near our destination. However, since we always stop at Toddington services going south for the toilets anyway, I thought I’d try an AC charge here (Toddington has no CCS/DC cable).

The i3, of course, does its slow charging on AC (alternating current) like all electric cars and its rapid charging on DC (direct current) like all electric cars except the Renault ZOE. However, the new i3 (the ’94ah’) has a trick up its sleeve – it can ‘medium charge’ on 3 phase AC (a feature shared only with the Tesla).

After about 10 minutes of mucking about with the Ecotricity app on my ‘phone it finally loaded, and the car started charging from the Type 2 cable (intended for rapid charging a ZOE). About quarter of an hour later, when we were ready to leave, we had taken on 2.5kWh of electricity. 2.5kWh in 14 minutes equates to about 11 kW charging power, which is what the i3 can theoretically achieve so it’s encouraging to see it working in a real situation.

2.5kWh charge after 14 minutes (Image: T. Larkum)
2.5kWh charge after 14 minutes (Image: T. Larkum)

Having said that, we only gained about 10 miles of range (so about 40 miles per hour). That’s certainly better than nothing, but doesn’t compete with true DC rapid charging where that’s available.

[Part 2 is here]

The Fuel Included i3 on show at the Holcot Car Boot Sale (Image: T. Larkum)

Another Public Event: Holcot Car Boot Sale

When we can, we try to show electric cars at public events, and it is pretty clear from talking to members of the public that perception and acceptance of electric cars is increasing fast. We have recently showed the i3 at Milton Keynes shopping centre, and a Renault ZOE in Kings Langley.

The Fuel Included i3 on show at the Holcot Car Boot Sale (Image: T. Larkum)
The Fuel Included i3 on show at the Holcot Car Boot Sale (Image: T. Larkum)

Ahead of either of those events, however, we showed the i3 at the Holcot Car Boot Sale. This is a very large event, known officially as the ‘Car Boot and Farmers Market’ and held at the Holcot Showground every Saturday and Thursday from April to October each year. Holcot is off the A43 about halfway between Northampton and Kettering.

At the time there weren’t actually any good offers available on the i3. However, that has now changed as we have arranged PCP deals on the i3 at very good rates. We are therefore in the process of contacting those people at Holcot who expressed interest in the i3 to offer them a test drive.

In our experience, with the i3 it’s a case of once driven, forever smitten!