Category Archives: Energy Storage

SolarCity System With Tesla Powerwall

Springtime May Be Coming Early for Britain’s Energy Storage Market

The U.K. government is on the verge of making structural changes to the energy market that will benefit storage

Powervault Energy Storage System (Image: Powervault.co.uk)
Powervault Energy Storage System (Image: Powervault.co.uk)

Last fall, the U.K. government reached out to players across the electricity industry for suggestions on how to reform the grid. Now industry observers are expecting the country’s energy storage market to take a major leap forward if legislation is enacted this spring.

The U.K. is set to become “the world’s best market for scaling up storage,” said Simon Daniel, CEO of energy storage developer Moixa.

“There’s a perfect storm on its way,”

thanks to a combination of new government promotion programs, a deregulated electricity market and a high adoption of solar, said Daniel.

The legislative changes should be implemented after the government finishes mulling over the results of a recent industry consultation on how to make the grid smarter and more flexible.

Joe Warren, managing director of storage developer Powervault, said the laws will

“focus on removing barriers and opening up access to electricity markets through smart tariffs and more stable network charging regimes.”

U.K. government officials have been warming to storage, most recently announcing funding for £9 million (USD $11 million) worth of projects. Storage advocates remain hopeful that the government will integrate their suggestions for market reform.

David Capper, deputy director and head of future electricity networks at the U.K.’s newly created department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), has expressed the need to encourage markets for flexibility services.

Removing the regulatory barriers for storage are a major priority for BEIS, Capper said. He also believes developers should be allowed to stack revenues.

Some regulatory changes boosting the prospects for storage are already underway. The regulator Ofgem is planning to separate management of the distribution system from National Grid’s management of the U.K. transmission system in order to encourage competition and improve flexibility.

The new distribution system operator role will allow for greater coordination with the regional network operators to help speed up the grid connection process for new projects, according to the Renewable Energy Agency.

Read more: Greentech Media

Energy companies are dead already, they just haven’t realised it

“The stone age came to an end, not for lack of stones, and the oil age will end, but not for lack of oil” (Sheikh Yamani OPEC co-founder and former Saudi Arabian oil minister)

Electricity companies around the world will begin to go bankrupt by 2018, even while they generate profits. It sounds absurd doesn’t it? However, hear me out.

By now everyone has read the headlines. “Tesla Powerwall changes everything, electricity death spiral, energy storage revolution, the Kodak moment for electricity etc.” This was the hype of 2015.

In 2016, reality set in, many households realised a $A17,999 5kW SolarEdge system with a 7kWh Tesla Powerwall would take about 17 years to pay back. These were sobering figures considering most equipment warranties are only 10-12 years. However, in just 2 years this payback equation will be radically different. It will rock the very foundations of modern society, creating and destroying fortunes across the planet.

Read more: Renew Economy

Tesla Model S

Mass adoption of electric vehicles is “much sooner than most people realize”

Blink and you missed the announcement. But last Friday, the UK’s much criticised energy supply grid system entered what is being seen as a “new era” with the announcement that eight large battery systems are being built to cope with the growing influx of wind and solar power.

Tesla Model S
Tesla Model S

The deal – the largest of its kind in Europe – will see seven companies, including Sweden’s Vattenfall and UK-based Renewable Energy Systems, install eight lithium-ion battery systems around Britain.

“This is the single largest contract in Europe we’ve ever seen for storage and the largest of its kind globally since August last year,”

said Logan Goldie-Scot, head of energy storage at the Bloomberg New Energy Finance research group told the Financial Times.

Storing electricity in batteries has long seen as the “holy grail” for renewables as battery storage of electricity helps to supply power on the days that the wind is not blowing or the sun is not shining.

And the move is aimed at helping the UK cope with the growing prevalence of renewables, which now account for a quarter of UK electricity generation, up from 9 per cent in just five years.

If renewables can provide electricity to the grid which can be stored when demand is needed it will help the electric car revolution that is taking place. Just as the electricity supply network needs storage in batteries so do electric cars, and it is a shortage of batteries which is threatening to keep the price of electric vehicles high for the time being.

But Tesla is changing the game on electric vehicles, a subject explored in today’s Financial Times, which asks what it calls a profound question: “Could electric cars ever cut the world’s thirst for oil enough to depress crude prices significantly?”

And the short answer is: Yes.

Read more: Price Of Oil

Welcome to Tesla Town

Less than six months after Australia received its first shipment of Tesla Powerwalls, plans for what could be the world’s first “Tesla town” – a mini-suburb on the outskirts of the Melbourne CBD whose new-build homes will include rooftop solar and Tesla battery storage as standard design features – are being unveiled by local property group Glenvill, as the green development’s first 60 homes go on sale this week.

Tesla Town, Melbourne

The new 16.46 hectare suburb, which will be called YarraBend for its 300 metres of Yarra River frontage, will include around 2,500 new dwellings – a mix of free standing houses, townhouses and apartments with three to five bedrooms, ranging in price from $1.48 million to $2.1 million.

The project is being designed, developed and built by Glenvill, which bills it as a “world first Tesla suburb” for its inclusion “within houses” of the iconic US company’s sleek-looking 7kWh lithium-ion Powerwall batteries, presumably to store energy from the houses’ rooftop solar systems, the sizes of which are not yet disclosed.

Houses in the development will also feature electric car recharging points, while residents will have access to high-speed internet, a “tech-concierge”, and a YarraBend app, that will connect them to a variety of amenities and information within the community, including public transport timetables, home delivery menus, carpooling arrangements and social events.

Read more: One Step off the Grid

National Grid wants the batteries to help it cope with the challenges of more wind and solar power (Image: PA)

New batteries to help Britain keep the lights on

Eight new battery storage projects are to be built around the UK after winning contracts worth £66m to help National Grid keep power supplies stable as more wind and solar farms are built.

EDF Energy, E.On and Vattenfall were among the successful companies chosen to build new lithium-ion batteries with a combined capacity of 200 megawatts (MW), under a new scheme to help Grid balance supply and demand within seconds.

National Grid wants the batteries to help it cope with the challenges of more wind and solar power (Image: PA)
National Grid wants the batteries to help it cope with the challenges of more wind and solar power (Image: PA)

Power generation and usage on the UK grid have to be matched as closely as possible in real-time to keep electricity supplies at a safe frequency so that household electrical appliances function properly.

Read more: Telegraph

New Life for Used EV Batteries as Stationary Storage

The electric vehicle market is set to grow quickly, but so far there has been no consensus on the ‘second-life’ of the used EV batteries.

In this report, senior analyst Claire Curry has compiled the first data and shows that low-cost energy storage could be here sooner than previously thought.

She projects:

  • There will be 29 GWh of used EV batteries coming out of cars in 2025. This far exceeds the size of the current stationary storage market.
  • Of this, almost a third will get a second life as stationary storage. (10GWh)
  • Today, a new stationary storage system can cost up to $1000/kWh. In contrast, repurposing used EV batteries could cost as little as $49/kWh in 2018, with an additional $400/kWh cost to convert to stationary.
  • The auto industry is divided on the issue. While Tesla won’t be involved in second life, BMW, Nissan and Mercedes Benz have second-life stationary storage projects in place.

batteries_fig1_storage_bnef

Source: BNEF.com

The floating solar farm on Godley Reservoir near Manchester (Image: A. Cooper/Guardian)

If wind and solar power are cheaper and quicker, do we really need Hinkley Point?

Nuclear energy’s cost, and a focus on alternative technology, including research on a new generation of hi-tech battery storage, is leading observers outside the green lobby to question the project’s value

Should Theresa May take the axe to the troubled Hinkley Point nuclear project, it will propel wind and solar power further into the limelight. And for renewable technologies to become really effective, Britain and the rest of the world need breakthroughs in electricity storage to allow intermittent power to be on tap 24/7, on a large scale and for the right price.

Cheap, light and long-life batteries are the holy grail, and achieving this requires the expertise of people like Cambridge professor Clare Grey. The award winning Royal Society fellow is working on the basic science behind lithium-air batteries, which can store five times the energy in the same space as the current rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that are widely used today.

The floating solar farm on Godley Reservoir near Manchester (Image: A. Cooper/Guardian)
The floating solar farm on Godley Reservoir near Manchester (Image: A. Cooper/Guardian)

She is also focusing on sodium-ion and redox flow batteries; the latter store power in a liquid form, contained in vats or tanks that in theory can easily be scaled up to power-grid sizes.

“There has been an amazing transformation in this field. There is an explosion of interest and I am extremely lucky to have decided early on to concentrate on this area,”

she says, although she is keen to play down the idea that a eureka moment is just around the corner.

She is also thankful for Hinkley – if only because of the government’s long-term funding deal with EDF Energy that it gave rise to.

“It has put a price on [future] electricity in the market which is high, and this has potentially opened up further commercial space for new technologies such as batteries. But independent of Hinkley we do need better batteries and my chemistry will hopefully help find them,” she says.

The wisdom of bringing in the Chinese to help EDF, the French state-owned utility company, construct the proposed new Somerset reactors has been highlighted as a key factor behind the government’s reluctance to push the go button.

But ministers are also aware that, in the last 18 months, many experts in the field have concluded that the biggest argument against the plant is not that it is too expensive, at £18.5bn, but that the kind of “on-all-the-time” power it delivers is no longer what is required.

Read more: The Guardian

Mavero Home Energy Storage Systems Offers Up To 9.6 kW Output For Charging

Kreisel Electric, which is building a new battery facility “3K One” in Austria, announced a new home energy storage solution – the MAVERO.

13537569_mavero_storage_kreisel

The Kreisel MAVERO is to be available from 2017 in four versions (each under €700/kWh *pre-tax):

  • 8 kWh / 4.8 kW / €5.590
  • 11 kWh / 4.8 kW / €7.530
  • 16 kWh / 9.6 kW / €10.860
  • 22 kWh / 9.6 kW / €14.740

The MAVERO reminds us a lot of the Tesla Powerwall, although each block is higher energy, and higher power.

If everything goes well, MAVERO should work for over 20 years, while the first 10 years is guaranteed.

“Kreisel Electric presents MAVERO, the highly efficient and beautifully designed home energy storage system

MAVERO is a highly efficient and flexible energy storage system for private and commercial application. Thanks to the modular design, each unit can be tailored precisely to individual conditions. The flexible home storage system will be available in four different sizes. The battery packs are based on Li-ion technology and the usable capacity ranges from 8 kWh to 22 kWh. The elegantly designed casing is available in two colours and communicates all charge and discharge activities by means of LED visualisation.

Berlin, 15. June 2016 Everyone is talking about renewable energy sources and the energy transition. One major problem for practical implementation, however, is the lack of suitable storage technology for irregular energy production. Austrian manufacturer of high performance batteries Kreisel Electric presented a viable solution for private households and commercial application at the Motorwerk in Berlin on June 15.

The new home storage system MAVERO – be self-sufficient

The name comes from the Italian language (“ma vero”) and translates roughly as “but true”. It is “true” that you can now supply yourself with energy from renewable sources – and, in the ideal scenario, even “fill up” your electric car. MAVERO enables independence from natural fluctuations in supply (e.g. wind lulls or insufficient sunlight) and worsening feed-in compensation from energy providers.

“The market is crying out for a high-end energy storage technology solution that is also stylish and really worth it for everyone,” stated Markus Kreisel, Marketing Manager with Kreisel Electric, at the premiere in Berlin.
Electricity storage with an elegant outfit

MAVERO is a wall-mounted home energy storage system that stores electricity from any renewable energy source. With its sophisticated design and a size of 105 x 140 cm (w x h), it can be installed in almost any interior space – even in the living room. MAVERO will be available in four versions, ranging from 8 to 22 kWh output volume, and a weight of 70 kg to 170 kg. The discharge power ranges from 4.8 to 9.6 kW in the voltage range from 288 to 384 V. Owners of electric vehicles in particular will be pleased, since the system enables accelerated loading with 100% self-generated electricity. Compared to competitors, the efficiency rate is unrivalled at 96% and the space requirement is considerably lower. With an installation volume of 1.95 dm3/kWh, Kreisel is able to achieve 70% more capacity in the MAVERO system in roughly the same size, thanks to their proprietary high-performance batteries.
Modular design and moderate price

The system is modular and can be installed quickly by a single technician at a relatively low cost. The modular design also offers flexible optimization based on your energy needs, since additional modules can be added later. An innovative lighting design (ambient interface LED) communicates the battery level and the charge and discharge activities. Kreisel Electric also wants to break new ground in terms of the price with their new “Kreisel Energy” division. Ultimately, the retail price should be under €700 per kWh.
Home storage paving the way for the energy revolution

MAVERO is designed to provide enough energy each day for the average household. The models MAVERO 20 and 28 have a higher capacity for more demanding applications like charging electric cars.

Read more: Inside EVs